Posts tagged shaggy parsol

Chloropyllum- with one exception

brunneum

Chorophyllum rochodes is a known as the shaggy parasol mushroom and is classed as edible. A paper by Vellinga in 2003* revises Chlorophyllum and Macrolepiota in Australia.  She says that we don’t have Chlorophyllum rachodes in Australia, but a similar species dubbed C. nothorachodes.  Specimens formerly referred to here as Chlorophyllum rachodes were found to be Chlorphyllum brunneum.  Macrolepiota procera, a northern hemisphere species, does not occur here.  Although her paper does help to sort out the state of the species in Australia, recent evidence suggests that her survey is not complete.

Much more common is Chlorophyllum brunneum, pictured above.  (You may see this same picture in a book, used without permission and mis-labelled)  This is distinguished by the basal bulb which is described as ‘abrupt’, which means that there is usually a definite change in geometry at the top of the bulb and it often has quite a flat top.   It also has a surface that is broken up into scales that have a fibrous appearance.  When cut it turns red.

Personally I find Chlorophyllum brunneum to be a very tasty mushroom with a strong meaty smell and flavour.  But apparently it does not agree with some people so caution is wise.

There are in addition many reports of people eating supposedly edible species in this group and one person has been violently ill while the other has not been affected.

Another member of the genus, Chlorophyllum molybdites (below) has a very similar appearance, but instead of white gills, they are faintly green.  It also has a green spore print when mature and the cap breaks up into scales that without a fibrous nature.   Sometimes the scales are almost absent.  It is not a deadly mushroom, but it may make you very sick and is a common cause of mushroom poisoning in North America. The nature of the poison in this mushroom was a mystery for a long time, particularly since it doesn’t affect all people at all times.  It was revealed in 2012 to be a  protein called molybdophyllysin by Yamada et al.  This protein is similar in structure to components of some other fungi and bacteria, but the other compounds are not toxic. It is heat labile, beginning to break down at 70 degrees, which may explain why some people, including the Cribbs report having eaten C. molybdites without ill effect.

The effect of temperature on the toxin in Chlorophyllum molybdites is shown in this graph from the above mentioned paper which plots activity against temperature for a 10 minute hold time.   It might be anticipated that prolonged boiling might considerably reduce toxicity.

molybdophyllysin temp effect

 

As a footnote, there is a report of the effects of eating this mushroom in the Medical Journal of Australia, by local academic Lindsay Mollison. I note that his report is in December 2011 and that he speaks of doing an extensive internet search to find out what he had eaten.   Perhaps his experience was just prior to when I made this original post in July 2011.  A shame.

*Here is a link to Vellinga’s paper.

July 2020.

The following account of poisoning by Chlorophyllum brunneum was written by my friend Martin and is published with his permission.

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I post and record this experience here so others won’t make the fatal mistake I did but also to potentially kill off some of my mushroom ego if you like

So as some of you may know I escaped the mainland last week on the last flight into tassie to go bushwalking with my wife who is not my wife who I would like to be my wife and step daughter etc both to Bush walk but secretly to hunt down in my opinion what I have heard to be the worlds greatest tasting mushrooms – and later I will post other things about various finds and it was really tongue to ground amazing but the story I am about to share was not so amazing well actually it was kind of amazing – you can see from the above grammar is not my strong point

So I picked some C brunneum (pictured) before the 7 day hike – and they were growing on mass like most mushrooms in Tasmania do – and on day one of the hike I got lost and a 7 hour walking day turning into an 11 hour walking day so when I arrived to camp I got out a bottle of wine and the Brunneys – Now I have eaten these mushrooms on three previous occasions and they are marvellous – so I told the rest of the camp the stories of hunting them down and cooked up a batch on high heat in the pan and surprisingly everyone except one fellow took my word for it and ate them – I was surprised as most people I find not so open to new mushrooms – but my banter must have been right on point cause everyone agreed a great tasting mushroom – and at this point I was the mushroom king

But this is where the story takes a twist

My wife who is not my wife but I would like to be wife offered to cook the next batch as I was tired and dead from walking and getting lost and mentioned something like I will cook these with less oil and low heat to save on gas etc and by this time I was tipsy and ranting about black trumpets and finding the lost porcini of Tasmania etc that I didn’t give it a second thought and a very large plate of mushrooms shortly arrived in front of me warm and a little on the raw side which I devoured very quickly with waving arms and dancing.

Fast forward a few hours later in my sleeping bag and I turn to my wife who you know isn’t my wife and she has ear plugs in and i say I feel sick and she says you always say that after eating mushrooms etc.

I just make it out the door and I am projectile vomiting all over the forest and everybody can hear the mushroom king – and this vomiting goes on and off for the next hour and it’s minus 3 outside and my wife is yelling at me also and nothing is subtle here – maybe no one can hear me I think – after cleaning up and hiding all the spew and evidence I think maybe no one will catch on And I make it back to bed.

After an hour or so there are indescribable sounds coming from my belly – and I should probably wind it up here but I really want to crush a good part of my mushroom ego here so I will continue – I find myself in thermal onesie which happens to be inside out
And I am listening to the sound in my belly going wow that sounds very impressive and then I think I need to get out of here quick
I make it to a tree and can’t find the zip as it not on the outside and what unfolds now is many folds and it’s too late to stop it and it’s coming out my ankles

The rest of the details and screams and tears into the frozen night is not that important here the clean up in frozen river etc

Over the next 6 days I found amazing edible mushrooms but I was now on a ban – my wife who is not my wife who I want to marry who won’t currently marry me has banned me from eating mushrooms and I had lost my title of the mushroom king – but over the next days I would find fields of giant laccaria and 10s of thousands of golden chanterelles and wild enoki and fist sized hedgehogs and I was banned
And no one believed anything I said at the camp – I was reduced to nothing and a laughing stock – but secretly I was happy to have lived through it cause you need some setbacks to clarify where you are headed in life don’t you think ?

The ban was lifted when on the 7th day the chants appeared thank the lord – and I am alive to tell the tale – I remember shouting into the night my kidneys are going to explode get a helicopter here now to Rosie my wife who is not

So what to take from all this –
Peter Donecker will probably be able to tell me what chemical I ingested in the brunneum and the importance of making sure chlorophyllum is well and truly cooked at a high heat etc before sticking them down the throat

The good news is I am alive
And have been eating many mushrooms and have been taken down a fair few pegs
But haven’t eaten Brunneum again
But I will be in Melb on Tuesday so hoping to find some

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